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Civic Museum launches new operating model

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

After months of community and partner engagement, the Civic Museum of Regina (CMoR) will be adopting a more contemporary model of museum – an approach that will focus on being a ‘story-driven’ museum to maximize sharing of information about its extensive artifact collection.

CMoR, with the support of the City of Regina, contracted Ken Alecxe, past CEO of SCN Television and Heritage Saskatchewan, to consult with stakeholders on various museum models. The overwhelming result was to develop a Contemporary Eco-museum whereby a museum without walls is created.  Simply put, it is the development of a heritage museum that engages the entire city and creates space for both public viewing and community engagement.  This becomes an opportunity to partner with numerous stakeholders, like-minded organizations, business and the entire community, in sharing our collective history.  This will be achieved through using traditional artifacts and sponsored satellite exhibits in existing spaces to engage a larger audience.  The community becomes the museum – from installations in the City Hall foyer to the new Mosaic Stadium; from shopping malls to seniors’ homes – the Museum will engage citizens where they work, live, shop and socialize.

Rob Deglau, President of the museum, says “This new model is quite exciting!  With the City of Regina’s first ever cultural plan in place, we feel the museum is well positioned to contribute in a new meaningful way to the citizens of Regina and we have already begun the development of partnerships, exhibits and programming that will begin appearing throughout the city.” 

Click here for the Feasibility Study and Business Plan Final Report.

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For further information, contact:

Rob Deglau, President, Board of Directors 
Civic Museum of Regina 
P: 306.535.4999 
E:  robdeglau@gmail.com

 

Spotlight

Polly in yellow dress

Polly in yellow dressThis beautiful doll is made of fine china, with brown hair, a yellow bonnet, and eyes that could open and close. Her yellow organdy dress is adorned with a black velvet ribbon decorated with pink flowers. White stockings and black boots complete her outfit.
This toy doll was donated to the museum in 1982 by Charles Morton.

Trivia

The popularity of elaborate fashion dolls such as Polly necessitated a need for experts to repair them. Beginning in the 1830’s several “doll hospitals” opened across Europe. These employed specialists who could fix the beloved toys.